Dog Tooth Cleaning, Houndstooth Pet Teeth Cleaning
non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning
non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning


Contact Us
Email

(818) 592-0383


Want to link to Houndstooth?

Please use this logo and let us know so we can put you on our site!

Houndstooth Dental, Dog Teeth Cleaning, Cat Teeth Cleaning, Non-Anesthetic Dental Cleaning for Dogs and Cats


Printing for less

 

Trachea Damage During Anesthetic Procedures

When most pet guardians consider an anesthetic procedure their concerns, and fears, go to the anesthetic itself. However, whenever a pet is anesthetized, a trachea tube must be inserted into the animal’s throat. Damage to the trachea can result from improper insertion of the trachea tube, using the wrong size tube and over or under inflation the trachea tube cuff. The results can range from a temporary cough to a permanent chronic cough & respiratory disability. Small dogs can be pre-disposed to weakened tracheas & thereby are more susceptible to trachea damage. However dogs of any size and cats can also have trachea damage. Pets with compromised tracheas may be more prone to complications during anesthetic procedures.
Trachea Damage During Anesthetic Procedures

What is a Collapsed Trachea?

First, we need to define exactly what a trachea does. It looks and feels a lot like a vacuum cleaner hose. The trachea is also known as the windpipe. It connects the mouth, nose and throat to the lungs. It provides the passageway for oxygen to enter the lungs when your pet inhales and for carbon dioxide to leave the body when your pet exhales. It consists of a muscle lined with semi-circular rings of cartilage.
Tracheal collapse can occur because of weakness in the cartilage rings of the trachea. Most people are at least somewhat familiar with what a trachea looks like, but basically it looks a lot like the vacuum cleaner hoses that have stiff rings with flexible material between them. For some reason, in many small and toy breed dogs (mostly), these rings are not strong. As time goes on, they do not support the softer lining material (the dorsal tracheal membrane) very well. So it tends to droop into the lumen of the trachea. When this happens, it causes a partial obstruction of the trachea, leading to the clinical signs of coughing and even difficulty breathing.
If the tracheal collapse occurs primarily in the part of the trachea that runs from the larynx to the neck, it is referred to as a cervical tracheal collapse. These types of collapse tend to be worse when the dog is inhaling. If the collapse occurs primarily in the part of the trachea that runs through the chest, the problem is a thoracic collapsing trachea. In this case, the difficulty breathing comes when the dog tries to exhale. Some dogs have both cervical and thoracic collapse and a few dogs only and thoracic trachea.
When the dorsal tracheal membrane collapses, it also becomes inflamed. This inflammation makes the whole process much worse and further induces coughing. The coughing itself causes more inflammation and the cycle can just go on and on. As the problem gets worse, it tends to affect the bronchi eventually and this makes severe respiratory difficulty more likely. Secondary pneumonia or bronchitis can make the clinical signs much worse until the problem is noticed and corrected.
In many cases diagnosis of tracheal collapse can be accomplished with X-rays. It is also possible to palpate (feel) the tracheal collapse in many dogs with cervical tracheal collapse. Despite this, it is best, whenever possible, to confirm this diagnosis with tracheoscopy, examination of the trachea directly with an endoscope or bronchoscope.

Tips for Living with Tracheal Collapse

You may know a dog who displays the telltale hacking cough when it runs or gets excited. Dogs with tracheal collapse are often a lot worse when they are excited than they are when they are just doing ordinary exercise. For this reason, it is helpful to try to control situations that lead to extreme excitement but not necessary to avoid controlled exercise.
In all dogs with tracheal collapse any kind of tracheal irritant should be avoided if possible. The most common contributing irritant is probably cigarette smoke. Having a dog with tracheal collapse is as good a reason as any to quit smoking or at least to try to avoid smoking while around the dog. Inhalant allergies are often a contributing factor to the severity of tracheal collapse problems. Dusty environments, dry interior environments in the winter and other things like this can cause irritation. Think about the possibility of these types of problems and eliminate them or control them to the best of your ability.
Never use a choke collar or even a regular collar when walking a dog with a compromised trachea. Instead opt for a small dog harness for walking your dog. These harnesses place the pressure on the much sturdier chest bone and away from the more fragile trachea.
non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning non-anesthetic pet teeth cleaning for dogs and cats, dog teeth cleaning